saveurmag:

Rogan Josh (Kashmiri Chile–Braised Lamb)Smoky red Kashmiri chile powder and rich ghee are the foundations of the sauce for tender lamb shanks in this classic dish served as part of the Kashmiri feast called wazwaan.
See More: The Ultimate Cake Guide »
SERVES 4 INGREDIENTS 1½ tbsp. red chile powder, preferably Kashmiri, or cayenne 2 tsp. ground fennel 2 tsp. ground ginger 1 tsp. asafoetida 1 tsp. cumin seeds 8 green cardamom pods 2 pieces mace or 1 tsp. ground mace 1 stick cinnamon, halved ⅓ cup ghee 5 black cardamom pods, cracked 4 lamb shanks, halved crosswise (ask your butcher to do this) Kosher salt, to taste ¼ tsp. saffron threads 2 tbsp. roughly chopped cilantro, for garnish Cooked white rice or naan bread, for serving (optional) INSTRUCTIONS 1. Stir chile powder, fennel, ginger, asafoetida, and ½ cup water in a bowl into a paste; set aside. Combine cumin, green cardamom, mace, and cinnamon in a spice grinder; grind into a powder and set aside. 2. Melt ghee in a 6-qt. saucepan over medium-high heat. Cook black cardamom until fragrant, 1–2 minutes. Season lamb with salt; cook, turning as needed, until browned, 5–7 minutes. Add reserved paste, the saffron, and 2 cups water; boil. Reduce heat to medium-low; cook, covered, until lamb is tender, 45 minutes to 1 hour. Stir in reserved spice powder; cook, covered, until lamb is very tender, 40–45 minutes. Garnish with cilantro; serve with rice or naan if you like.
See More: A Menu of Spicy Sichuan Dishes »

saveurmag:

Rogan Josh (Kashmiri Chile–Braised Lamb)

Smoky red Kashmiri chile powder and rich ghee are the foundations of the sauce for tender lamb shanks in this classic dish served as part of the Kashmiri feast called wazwaan.

See More: The Ultimate Cake Guide »

SERVES 4

INGREDIENTS
1½ tbsp. red chile powder, preferably Kashmiri, or cayenne
2 tsp. ground fennel
2 tsp. ground ginger
1 tsp. asafoetida
1 tsp. cumin seeds
8 green cardamom pods
2 pieces mace or 1 tsp. ground mace
1 stick cinnamon, halved
⅓ cup ghee
5 black cardamom pods, cracked
4 lamb shanks, halved crosswise (ask your butcher to do this)
Kosher salt, to taste
¼ tsp. saffron threads
2 tbsp. roughly chopped cilantro, for garnish
Cooked white rice or naan bread, for serving (optional)

INSTRUCTIONS
1. Stir chile powder, fennel, ginger, asafoetida, and ½ cup water in a bowl into a paste; set aside. Combine cumin, green cardamom, mace, and cinnamon in a spice grinder; grind into a powder and set aside.

2. Melt ghee in a 6-qt. saucepan over medium-high heat. Cook black cardamom until fragrant, 1–2 minutes. Season lamb with salt; cook, turning as needed, until browned, 5–7 minutes. Add reserved paste, the saffron, and 2 cups water; boil. Reduce heat to medium-low; cook, covered, until lamb is tender, 45 minutes to 1 hour. Stir in reserved spice powder; cook, covered, until lamb is very tender, 40–45 minutes. Garnish with cilantro; serve with rice or naan if you like.

See More: A Menu of Spicy Sichuan Dishes »

DRIED MINT DUSTED CORNISH HENS OVER POTATOES AND ONIONS WITH WINE JUS

Cornish chickens are a large English breed with white, black or red feathers. They are a heritage breed, meaning they’ve been bred for many years in a particular location with traits conducive to thriving in that environment. They are now raised by backyard enthusiasts and small farms. Cornish chickens are poor egg-layers and are bred for meat. A Cornish hen is female and can be any size.

Cornish hens are a great substitute for a chicken - they cook faster since they are smaller and can make a beautiful presentation for company.

One hen will feed two people generously and one very hungry person.

Cook it much like a roast chicken.

Preheat your oven to 450 degrees.

Dry the hens and season with salt and pepper and I like to use dried Turkish mint - you can use thyme or rosemary, even oregano or marjoram.

Cut up onions and potatoes into 2 inch pieces (feel free to use other root vegetables such as turnips, parsnips, sweet potatoes, etc).

Season the vegetables with salt, pepper and your choice of herb along with a couple of table spoons of olive oil.

Strew the vegetables in a baking dish and place the seasoned hens on top.

Rub a couple of tablespoons of olive oil or a pat of softened butter over the hens.

I also like to stuff the cavity with cut up lemons or limes to flavor the hens from the inside.

Bake for 45 minutes and then lower the oven temperature to 350.

Cook another 15 or 20 minutes depending on the size of the hens or until their internal temperature reaches 160 degrees.

Remove the baking dish from the oven and place the hens on a cutting board and let rest for at least 10 minutes.

In the mean time add a cup of white wine or chicken broth to the baking dish and cook over a high flame to allow the alcohol to evaporate.

Finish with a dollop of butter to round off the sauce.

Cut the hens in half and serve atop the vegetables.

Spoon the sauce over the hens and serve.

You have dinner.

Until I eat again!

culturecheese:

Say Cheese with Bill Maher, “New Rule: Americans have to come up with a better cheese to represent the nation than American cheese. I’m not even sure American cheese is cheese. I think it’s aged Jell-O.”
Photo thanks to Lucy McCalmont 

so true

culturecheese:

Say Cheese with Bill Maher, “New Rule: Americans have to come up with a better cheese to represent the nation than American cheese. I’m not even sure American cheese is cheese. I think it’s aged Jell-O.”

Photo thanks to Lucy McCalmont 

so true

Most people have one father - I was blessed with two.

One is no longer in this world but it would’ve been his birthday today.

I was nine when he passed away and I often wonder what he would’ve thought of me.

What would we have shared and what would we have butted heads on?

I know that food would’ve been something we would’ve had in common - he loved to cook and eat.  Which is something I do too and think I got from him:)

I have a step dad and he has been in my life for 30 years and so has been around much more than my biological father.

He is a special man and I am a lucky girl to be his princess :)

I have never ever been a picky eater.

Well, let me rephrase that - I think I was when I was a child except my mother never jumped hoops around me.

We all had to eat what was served and if we didn’t like what that was - there would be another meal in a few hours :)

I do like that philosophy.

I was silly, I would sit for hours with the food I didn’t like in front of me as I wasn’t allowed to leave the table without cleaning my plate.

Like a fool I would eat my favorite things first and then just sit staring at the stuff I didn’t like.

This is my very cute and talented little niece Mahi - she is quite the picky eater.  Except she is catered to a lot more than I was and so she gets to eat what she wants.

I tried widening her horizons when we recently spent a few weeks together in Sydney.  She ate he fried egg - can you believe that.

She enjoys cooking and so encouraging a child to cook with you or by themselves, allows them to experiment and be more adventurous.

Are you or do you have any picky eaters in your life?

What do you do?

Until I eat again!

Tags: picky eaters

Asian Inspired Salmon with Pickled Ginger over Fettuccine

Salmon is such a lovely fish for it’s flavor, robustness to stand up to intense flavors and of course if so very good for you.

I try to cook fish at least once a week - three times would be ideal - something I aspire to work towards.

I sprinkled Chinese five spice powder generously over the filets along with salt and pepper.

I like using Mustard oil, which has a peppery flavor and is also quite healthful.

It has a high smoking point which means it doesn’t burn at high temperatures and you can get a lovely sear with a delicious brown crust on the fish.

Sear the fish on the skin side at least 5 minutes without moving it - no matter how much you want to do it -don’t do it.  Stand back, leave the kitchen or better yet put some water on to boil for the pasta.

Turn the fish over and add greens like spinach, bok choy or collards.  I added some cherry tomatoes, sliced ginger, minced garlic and a splash of mirin.  You can use broth, another white wine or even water.

You are trying to create a little sauce for the pasta to absorb.

When the pasta is cooked, add to the fish and green and cook for a couple of minutes till the liquid is absorbed by the pasta.

Garnish with pickled ginger and you have dinner.

Until I eat again!

cheesenotes:

Now available on Etsy.com: Stilton cufflinks!

These tiny Stilton cheese wedges are so whimsy and delicate.
Each wedge of the blue cheese measures 15X19 mm and mounted on silver plated cuff links.
Please note: all of my pieces are handmade. Each piece is unique and features slightly different details.


I so want these!

cheesenotes:

Now available on Etsy.com: Stilton cufflinks!

These tiny Stilton cheese wedges are so whimsy and delicate.

Each wedge of the blue cheese measures 15X19 mm and mounted on silver plated cuff links.

Please note: all of my pieces are handmade. Each piece is unique and features slightly different details.

I so want these!

yum

yum

(via foodfuck)

Swedish Meatball fettucine in a creamy dill sauce

For the past few weekends my dad and I have had a standing date watching Homeland - the amazing Showtime show.  We watch several episodes a weekend to get ready for the new season starting October 5th.

This date sometimes puts a crimp on our dinner style :)

The wine is flowing freely as we watch but this girl can’t live on wine alone.

The father made a request for pasta with Swedish meatballs.

In my mind Swedish meatballs means tons of dill in a sourcream sauce and so that’s what I did.

We took a twenty minute break from our TV watching and I had dinner ready at the end of it.

I took coarse minced beef (you can use turkey, chicken, pork or a combination of) and added a handful of chopped dill, garlic, salt, pepper and red pepper flakes.

I browned these in olive oil as the pasta cooked in salted water.

When the meatballs were browned in about 10 minutes or so, I added a cup of sourcream and a half cup of milk.  I added the pasta to this mixture, more dill and chopped garlic - and then red pepper flakes because that’s what I do. 

Some vinegar or lemon juice for a tang, check for seasoning and dinner is ready.

Ladle in bowls and we watch as we are mesmerized by Homeland.

Try this recipe, watching TV or not.

I promise you will love it.

Until I eat again!

It’s Friday and the weather is cool.
What do you like to cook and eat on the weekend.
Pasta is always my go to, also stews and I am thinking of turning on the oven for pizza and my famous focaccia.
Until I cook again!

It’s Friday and the weather is cool.

What do you like to cook and eat on the weekend.

Pasta is always my go to, also stews and I am thinking of turning on the oven for pizza and my famous focaccia.

Until I cook again!